September 13, 2006

Mary Jane (and I'm not talking about my Grandma)

I'm not for or against marijuana, but I know plenty of people from my past who have smoked it on a daily basis and I have to say that I never found them to do anything crazy, act out or commit any crimes because of it. (Actually they seemed more at peace with themselves and their lives.) However, the thing that gets me is the fact that alcohol is legal and yet it kills people every day. Then we also have the huge number of drunk driving deaths where innocent people are being killed and the drunk drivers get a slap on the hand, some community service and are back in the bars the next weekend. Funny, you never hear of someone dying from or being killed by someone who has been smoking pot.

Again, this is not something that I take part in, I just find this as another situation where the government has too much power. Because it's a plant and they can't put a patent on it and make money, it's illegal. I wonder if there weren't so many alcoholics in the Senate if they'd make alcohol illegal? It seems to have done more harm than any marijuana plant.

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Number of American deaths per year that result directly or primarily from the following selected causes nationwide, according to World Almanacs, Life Insurance Actuarial (death) Rates, and the last 20 years of U.S. Surgeon Generals' reports.
TOBACCO
340,000 to 450,000
ALCOHOL (Not including 50% of all highway deaths and 65% of all murders)
150,000+
ASPIRIN (Including deliberate overdose)
180 to 1,000+
CAFFEINE (From stress, ulcers, and triggering irregular heartbeats, etc.)
1,000 to 10,000
"LEGAL" DRUG OVERDOSE (Deliberate or accidental) from legal, prescribed or patent medicines and/or mixing with alcohol - e.G. Valium/alcohol
14,000 to 27,000
ILLICIT DRUG OVERDOSE (Deliberate or accidental) from all illegal drugs.
3,800 to 5,200
MARIJUANA
0 (yes, that's right... 0!)

(Marijuana users also have the same or lower incidence of murders and highway deaths and accidents than the general non-marijuana using population as a whole. Crancer Study, UCLA; U.S. Funded ($6 million), First & Second Jamaican Studies, 1968 to 1974; Costa Rican Studies, 1980 to 1982; et al. LOWEST TOXICITY 100% of the studies done at dozens of American universities and research facilities show pot toxicity does not exist. Medical history does not record anyone dying from an overdose of marijuana (UCLA, Harvard, Temple , etc.).

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration In The Matter Of MARIJUANA RESCHEDULING PETITION Docket No. 86-22 OPINION AND RECOMMENDED RULING, FINDINGS OF FACT, CONCLUSIONS OF LAW AND DECISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGE FRANCIS L. YOUNG, Administrative Law Judge DATED: SEPTEMBER 6, 1988
Section 8 of Judge Young's "Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Decision."
Page 56 & 57 http://mojo. calyx.net/ ~olsen/MEDICAL/ YOUNG/young

3. The most obvious concern when dealing with drug safety is the possibility of lethal effects. Can the drug cause death?

4. Nearly all medicines have toxic, potentially lethal effects. But marijuana is not such a substance. There is no record in the extensive medical literature describing a proven, documented cannabis-induced fatality.
This is a remarkable statement. First, the record on marijuana encompasses 5,000 years of human experience. Second, marijuana is now used daily by enormous numbers of people throughout the world. Estimates suggest that from twenty million to fifty million Americans routinely, albeit illegally, smoke marijuana without the benefit of direct medical supervision. Yet, despite this long history of use and the extraordinarily high numbers of social smokers, there are simply no credible medical reports to suggest that consuming marijuana has caused a single death.

6. By contrast aspirin, a commonly used, over-the-counter medicine, causes hundreds of deaths each year.

7. Drugs used in medicine are routinely given what is called an LD-50. The LD-50 rating indicates at what dosage fifty percent of test animals receiving a drug will die as a result of drug induced toxicity. A number of researchers have attempted to determine marijuana's LD-50 rating in test animals, without success. Simply stated, researchers have been unable to give animals enough marijuana to induce death.

8. At present it is estimated that marijuana's LD-50 is around 1:20,000 or 1:40,000. In layman terms this means that in order to induce death a marijuana smoker would have to consume 20,000 to 40,000 times as much marijuana as is contained in one marijuana cigarette. NIDA-supplied marijuana cigarettes weigh approximately .9 grams. A smoker would theoretically have to consume nearly 1,500 pounds of marijuana within about fifteen minutes to induce a lethal response.

9. In practical terms, marijuana cannot induce a lethal response as a result of drug-related toxicity.

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I just thought this was interesting.

1 Comment:

whomadeyougodtosay said...

You make some interesting points. However, I do disagree with you on some terms. I agree with you on alcohol. I disagree with you on smoking. I'm not sure if you just wanted to show people die from it or not, but people treat cigarettes like they are the plague when alcohol is much worse. I'd rather have someone smoke a cigarette then marijuana or drink and drive. I can tell you I've seen many people smoke marijuana and get in a car to drive. They are too messed up to drive. I've seen people use drugs and alcohol at the same time which is a more lethal combination. If you try to make it legal things will get worse before they get better. We as Americans like to over indulge. Not to mention you can't smoke marijuana then return to work like nothing happened like a cigarette. You'd have to tightly control it. And with that I say good luck.